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Jacob Broband’s Ownership

 

The earliest tax lists for York County in general and Newberry Township in specific that are available to us today date from the mid 1760’s.  The lack of tax lists between 1737 and the 1760’s make it impossible to determine when Jacob Broband first began ownership of the land that started off in Samuel Hall’s possession.  Since no deeds, warrants or patents are recorded, it cannot be known whether Jacob Broband’s ownership followed immediately after the Hall family’s ownership period.  Perhaps another owner or owners were between the ownership period of Samuel Hall and his son Thomas and Jacob Broband.

 

The first tax list for Newberry Township of York County which is available to us today is dated 1765.  Jacob Broband appears on this tax list.  However, his last name is spelled Provent.  Throughout the years his family name is spelled in a variety of ways including Broband, Brovant, Provent, Proband and Provant.  The excerpted images below are from the 1765 Newberry Township tax list.  The first image is of the first page showing headings and the date.  The second image is from a later page where Jacob Provent is included:

 

From first page of 1765 Newberry Township tax list:

 

 

From fourth page of 1765 Newberry Township tax list:

 

 

This 1765 tax list indicates that Jacob Provent (Broband) owned 100 acres of land, 6 of which had been cleared.  It also indicated that he owned 4 sows, 2 horses and mares, 1 Cow and 2 sheep.  The next name on the list to his name is for Gotlip Fisher.  Gottlieb Fischer (German spelling) owned the tract of land bordering the northern boundary of what had been Samuel Hall’s land.  His son David Fisher inherited this farm when Gottlieb Fischer died in 1792. 

 

David was the owner of the property when Anthony Yinger, John Fetrow and John Shuman went through the legal steps to have their subdivided sections of Samuel Hall’s original warrant surveyed and patented.  The appearance of Gottlieb Fischer’s name next to Jacob Provent (Broband) on the 1765 tax list strongly suggests that the 100 acres listed for Jacob is for the farm once belonging to Samuel Hall and his son Thomas.  Of some mystery is why the acreage is only 100 acres instead of 140 aces in 1765. 

 

Later tax lists indicate the acreage for Jacob Broband’s “plantation” as 140 acres.  Either the 1765 list is only an approximation of acreage or Jacob obtained the former Samuel Hall property in several steps.  The indication of only 6 acres as being cleared in 1765 possibly gives insight into the slow backbreaking process and pace of turning the property from rocky and/or forested land into “cleared” farm land.  Cleared land was taxed at a higher value per acre than “woodland” which had not been cleared and made ready for farming.

 

According to the 1765 tax list Gottlieb Fischer’s land also constituted 100 acres but 25 acres had been cleared.  Clearly, the Fisher property had been subdued from wild forest into farmland to a much greater degree than the Broband farm had been by 1765.  As an aside, the Fisher property had originally been warranted to a David Bailey in 1737 for 200 acres. 

 

Gottlieb’s son David went through the formal steps to have it patented in 1812 according to Hively in his book titled NEWBERRY AND FAIRVIEW TOWNSHIPS, York County, Pennsylvania; Original Pennsylvania Land Record Series (Volume 15).  The boundaries of this property adjacent to Samuel Hall’s land are shown on the companion map (33) of Hively excerpted in part in a previous section of this web page.  Following is the entry from Hively’s book for the Fisher property which shared a common border with Samuel Hall’s land:

 

 

Jacob Broband died in 1777 according to his estate file the details of which are presented in another section of this web site.  After that date his land is reported on tax lists with his wife Ann “Jacob’s widow” as owner.  On tax lists prior to 1777 another man named Christian or Christopher Broband is listed often next to Jacob Broband on tax lists.  Perhaps they were brothers. 

 

Christopher Broband owned a sizeable amount of land as well.  He also was married to a woman named Ann.  Sadly, Christopher also disappears from tax lists in the late 1770’s and his wife Ann replaces him where she is listed as “widow” of Christopher.  So it seems that two brothers named Jacob and Christopher Broband married two women each named Ann.  The brothers both died in the late 1770’s at a time when the country was in turmoil due to the Revolutionary War with England. 

 

As a result of this tragic set of events, the widow’s of the Broband (Probant, & etc.) brothers were left with farms to manage without their husbands.  In another section of this web site a complete transcript of the 1780 tax list for Newberry Township is presented.  Below is an excerpt of that transcription showing the Probant women each named Ann listed as Jacob and Christopher’s widows:

 

 

Acres

Negroes

Horses

Cattle

Tax

Paul Yenger

    --

    --

    --

1

13 .0

James Welsh

300

   --

3

4

45 .8 .0

Andrew Welsh

    --

    --

2

    --

10.12 .0

William Hunter

    --

    --

    --

1

0

James Mills

50

    --

2

4

20 .8 .0

Michael Purger

    --

    --

2

4

14 .0

Ann Probant, Jacob's widow

140

    --

2

2

32 .7.10

Jesse Wickersham

130

    --

1

2

19 .0 .0

John Shoeman

350

    --

4

12

54.15. .0

Ellis Rogers

    --

    --

2

2

2 .2 .0

James Wickersham

130

    --

    --

1

19 .0 .0

John Pehler

80

    --

2

3

13 .0 .0

John Hays

    --

    --

    --

1

13 .0

Benjamin House

    --

    --

1

2

1.16 .0

Aaron Wright

94

    --

2

3

15 .3 .6

Ann Probant, Christopher's widow

200

    --

2

1

27 .0 .0

 

In another section of this web site the contents of the estate file of Jacob Broband are presented and discussed in depth.  Jacob Broband 1777-1785 Estate Documents.  From a review of that information it appears that Jacob’s widow managed to continue to hold and manage the 140 acre “plantation” for about a decade after her husband’s death. 

 

In about 1782 two of Jacob and Anna Broband’s daughters, Sophronia and Magdelena, married two of Paul Jünger’s sons, George and Anthony respectively.  This fact can be deduced by the arrival of children to these two couples in 1783 and 1784.  George Yinger and “Freny” (Broband) Yinger had a daughter they named Ann (aka Nancy) in 1784.  She would be the only child born to this couple.  Anthony Yinger and his wife Magdelena (Broband) Yinger had their first born child, a son, and named him Jacob in 1783.  Many other sons and daughters were born to this couple in the succeeding years.

 

According to a document in Jacob Broband’s estate file which is presented in transcript form on this web site, in 1788 George Yinger and his wife “Freny” (Broband) acquired the 140 acre “plantation” in Newberry Township of York County, Pennsylvania from Jacob Broband’s estate. Sheriff's land appraisal response to the petition, November 1788.  This transfer ended the period of ownership of Jacob and Anna Broband and started the ownership of George Yinger and his wife “Freny” (Broband) Yinger.

 

 

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